This is your brain on drugs.

Image of the Week - September 1, 2014


CIL:14971 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/14971Description: Distribution of interneurons expressing EGFP from the 5HT3 receptor promoter (Tg(Htr3a-EGFP)DH30Gsat, www.gensat.org) in the dorsal hippocampus colabelled for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (red) and counterstained with DAPI (blue) to show the cell layers. This image is part of a series characterizing EGFP expression from the 5HT3 promoter throughout the brain.Authors: Margaret I. DavisLicensing: Public Domain: This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. However, as is the norm in scientific publishing and as a matter of courtesy, any user should credit the content provider for any public or private use of this image whenever possible.

This is your brain on drugs.

Image of the Week - September 1, 2014

CIL:14971 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/14971

Description: Distribution of interneurons expressing EGFP from the 5HT3 receptor promoter (Tg(Htr3a-EGFP)DH30Gsat, www.gensat.org
) in the dorsal hippocampus colabelled for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (red) and counterstained with DAPI (blue) to show the cell layers. This image is part of a series characterizing EGFP expression from the 5HT3 promoter throughout the brain.

Authors: Margaret I. Davis

Licensing: Public Domain: This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. However, as is the norm in scientific publishing and as a matter of courtesy, any user should credit the content provider for any public or private use of this image whenever possible.

Image of the Week – August 25, 2014 
CIL:38990 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38990
Description: Colorized scanning electron micrograph of a human egg. The egg is surrounded by a glycoprotein coat called the zona pellucida which aids in trapping and binding the sperm. Two residual coronal cells from the ovarian follicle are attached to the zona pellucida. The egg is sitting on the point of a pin.
Author: Yorgos Nikas
Licensing:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week – August 25, 2014 

CIL:38990 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38990

DescriptionColorized scanning electron micrograph of a human egg. The egg is surrounded by a glycoprotein coat called the zona pellucida which aids in trapping and binding the sperm. Two residual coronal cells from the ovarian follicle are attached to the zona pellucida. The egg is sitting on the point of a pin.

Author: Yorgos Nikas

Licensing:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week – August 18, 2014 
CIL:38912 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38912
Description: Human HeLa cancer cells in culture showing the nuclei in red and the tubulin component of the cytoskeleton in green. The blue staining is a mitotic checkpoint protein that remains in the cytoplasm until pro-metaphase when it is involved in regulating cell division. HeLa cells are derived from a human cervical cancer and can be propogated indefinitely in culture.
Author: Matthew Daniels
Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week – August 18, 2014 

CIL:38912 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38912

DescriptionHuman HeLa cancer cells in culture showing the nuclei in red and the tubulin component of the cytoskeleton in green. The blue staining is a mitotic checkpoint protein that remains in the cytoplasm until pro-metaphase when it is involved in regulating cell division. HeLa cells are derived from a human cervical cancer and can be propogated indefinitely in culture.

Author: Matthew Daniels

LicensingAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Four wonderful years so far. Image of the Week – August 11, 2014 
We thank you for the wonderful gift of over 500,000 visits and almost 2 million pages viewed.
To thank you we present one of your favorite images from the past.
CIL:38817 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38817
Description: Scanning electron micrograph of a Vaginicola, a single-celled creature found in pond water. The cell (green) secretes and lives within a protective casing called a lorica into which it can contract. The cell is attached to the bottom of the lorica and has hair-like cilia at the end, which it uses for feeding. Scanning electron micrograph 2000 Collection Wellcome Images. 
Author: David Furness

Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Four wonderful years so far. Image of the Week – August 11, 2014 

We thank you for the wonderful gift of over 500,000 visits and almost 2 million pages viewed.

To thank you we present one of your favorite images from the past.

CIL:38817 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38817

Description: Scanning electron micrograph of a Vaginicola, a single-celled creature found in pond water. The cell (green) secretes and lives within a protective casing called a lorica into which it can contract. The cell is attached to the bottom of the lorica and has hair-like cilia at the end, which it uses for feeding. Scanning electron micrograph 2000 Collection Wellcome Images. 

Author: David Furness

LicensingAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

New Easier to Use Site Design! Image of the Week - July 28, 2014


Now access the 2D image, the reconstruction, and the segmentation data all on one page (when available.)
http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/40260
Description:  Maximum intensity projection of Golgi impregnated pyramidal neurons in the neocortex of an adult mouse, imaged via serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. Contrast is reversed so that Golgi stain appears bright against the unstained background. This image has been downsampled from the raw data image which can be accessed using the link provided to the Cell Centered Database.
Authors: Mark Ellisman and Stephen Larson




License: Attribution Only: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. 

New Easier to Use Site Design! Image of the Week - July 28, 2014

Now access the 2D image, the reconstruction, and the segmentation data all on one page (when available.)

http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/40260

Description:  Maximum intensity projection of Golgi impregnated pyramidal neurons in the neocortex of an adult mouse, imaged via serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. Contrast is reversed so that Golgi stain appears bright against the unstained background. This image has been downsampled from the raw data image which can be accessed using the link provided to the Cell Centered Database.

Authors: Mark Ellisman and Stephen Larson

License: Attribution Only: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. 

Explore! Microtubule Organizing Centers- Interactive Illustration
Image of the Week - July 21, 2014
http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/browse/cellcomponent/Microtubule%20Organizing%20Centers
Description:  To get to this interactive microtubule organizing  centers illustration simply click microtubule organizing  centers on our interactive eukaryotic cell currently on the home page of The Cell: An Image Library-CCDB or simply follow the link above. With a unique graphical interface, these images help you to make the bridge from an abstract illustration to the reality of microscopic images. Hover over a term and the corresponding structure highlights or hover over the structure and the term highlights - then just click to search the library. 
Author: Janet Iwasa



Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial Share Alike License.

Explore! Microtubule Organizing Centers- Interactive Illustration

Image of the Week - July 21, 2014

http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/browse/cellcomponent/Microtubule%20Organizing%20Centers

Description:  To get to this interactive microtubule organizing  centers illustration simply click microtubule organizing  centers on our interactive eukaryotic cell currently on the home page of The Cell: An Image Library-CCDB or simply follow the link above. With a unique graphical interface, these images help you to make the bridge from an abstract illustration to the reality of microscopic images. Hover over a term and the corresponding structure highlights or hover over the structure and the term highlights - then just click to search the library. 

Author: Janet Iwasa

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial Share Alike License.

Image of the Week - July 14, 2014
CIL:41644 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/41644
Description: Confocal micrograph of a mast cell in human eye with conjunctivitis. This image shows a single mast cell invading conjunctival tissue in response to an inflammatory agent or pathogen. The mast cell contains vesicles of histamine (red dots). Mast cells are among the first cells of the immune system to react to the presence of an invading pathogen and they facilitate the movement of leukocytes (white blood cells) and other immune cells toward the site of infection. The image is composed of 42 stacked sections. Honorable Mention, 2011 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®.
Authors: Donald Pottle and the 2011 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®
Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

Image of the Week - July 14, 2014

CIL:41644 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/41644

DescriptionConfocal micrograph of a mast cell in human eye with conjunctivitis. This image shows a single mast cell invading conjunctival tissue in response to an inflammatory agent or pathogen. The mast cell contains vesicles of histamine (red dots). Mast cells are among the first cells of the immune system to react to the presence of an invading pathogen and they facilitate the movement of leukocytes (white blood cells) and other immune cells toward the site of infection. The image is composed of 42 stacked sections. Honorable Mention, 2011 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®.

Authors: Donald Pottle and the 2011 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

Not what you think. Image of the Week - July 7, 2014
CIL:41914 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/41914
Description: Brightfield image of Quercus (oak) leaf with tufted trichomes (fine outgrowths or appendages on plants and certain protists). Honorable Mention, 2009 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®.
Authors: Uma Ganesan and the 2009 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®
Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

Not what you think. Image of the Week - July 7, 2014

CIL:41914 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/41914

DescriptionBrightfield image of Quercus (oak) leaf with tufted trichomes (fine outgrowths or appendages on plants and certain protists). Honorable Mention, 2009 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®.

Authors: Uma Ganesan and the 2009 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

Mitosis again. Image of the Week - June 30, 2014
CIL:42513 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/42513
Description: Pig epithelial (LLC-PK1) cells undergoing mitosis. Image shows microtubules (green) and chromosomes (purple) and was collected using a spinning disk confocal and deconvolution microscopy. Honorable Mention, 2005 Olympus BioScapes Competition.
Authors: Nassar Rusan and the 2005 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®
Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

Mitosis again. Image of the Week - June 30, 2014

CIL:42513 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/42513

DescriptionPig epithelial (LLC-PK1) cells undergoing mitosis. Image shows microtubules (green) and chromosomes (purple) and was collected using a spinning disk confocal and deconvolution microscopy. Honorable Mention, 2005 Olympus BioScapes Competition.

Authors: Nassar Rusan and the 2005 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

Look Ma, No Cavities! Image of the Week - June 23, 2014CIL:38807 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38807Description: This color-enhanced photomicrograph shows different species of bacteria that cause dental plaque - a colorless film that forms on teeth caused by the growth of bacterial colonies. Plaque develops naturally, and in most cases can be easily removed with regular brushing. However, if left it can harden and cause dental calculus (tartar), which is difficult to remove and if not treated can result in tooth decay. This image shows different species of oral bacterial colonies, including Capnocytophaga and Aggregatibacter, growing on an agar plate. A sample of plaque was removed from a periodontal pocket of a patient with gum disease. The periodontal pocket is the region between the tooth surface and the periodontium (gum). The bacterial colonies were left to grow in culture on an agar plate so they could be studied more closely. Lighting the agar plate from below shows the detail and differences between the structure (morphology) of the colonies present. The original image was colorless so a color was added post-imaging to emphasize the colony morphology and identify the different species of bacteria present.Author: Derren ReadyLicensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Look Ma, No Cavities! Image of the Week - June 23, 2014

CIL:38807 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38807

Description: This color-enhanced photomicrograph shows different species of bacteria that cause dental plaque - a colorless film that forms on teeth caused by the growth of bacterial colonies. Plaque develops naturally, and in most cases can be easily removed with regular brushing. However, if left it can harden and cause dental calculus (tartar), which is difficult to remove and if not treated can result in tooth decay. This image shows different species of oral bacterial colonies, including Capnocytophaga and Aggregatibacter, growing on an agar plate. A sample of plaque was removed from a periodontal pocket of a patient with gum disease. The periodontal pocket is the region between the tooth surface and the periodontium (gum). The bacterial colonies were left to grow in culture on an agar plate so they could be studied more closely. Lighting the agar plate from below shows the detail and differences between the structure (morphology) of the colonies present. The original image was colorless so a color was added post-imaging to emphasize the colony morphology and identify the different species of bacteria present.

Author: Derren Ready

Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)