Image of the Week - October 13, 2014

CIL:39060 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/39060

Description: Confocal micrograph of osteoblast cells labeled with Alexafluor 488 that stains alpha tubulin (green) and phalloidin marking the actin (purple) and DAPI highlighting the nucleus (yellow). Osteoblasts originate in bone marrow and contribute to the production of new bone. These cells build up the matrix of bone structure and as bone is continually being reabsorbed and regenerated these are very crucial cells. Osteoblasts make up bone and osteoclasts break it down.

Author: Kevin MacKenzie

Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week - October 13, 2014

CIL:39060 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/39060

DescriptionConfocal micrograph of osteoblast cells labeled with Alexafluor 488 that stains alpha tubulin (green) and phalloidin marking the actin (purple) and DAPI highlighting the nucleus (yellow). Osteoblasts originate in bone marrow and contribute to the production of new bone. These cells build up the matrix of bone structure and as bone is continually being reabsorbed and regenerated these are very crucial cells. Osteoblasts make up bone and osteoclasts break it down.

Author: Kevin MacKenzie

LicensingAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Over 2 million pages served! 

Mitosis - Image of the Week - October 6, 2014

CIL:191 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/191Description: The image shows mitotic metaphase (upper) and anaphase (lower) in Drosophila tissue culture cells immunostained for the microtubule severing protein katanin (green), microtubules (red) and kinetochores/chromosomes (blue). Katanin targets to chromosomes during both metaphase and anaphase and is responsible for inducing the depolymerization of attached microtubule plus-ends..Authors: David Sharp, Dong Zhang, Gregory Rogers, and Daniel BusterLicensing: Public Domain: This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. However, as is the norm in scientific publishing and as a matter of courtesy, any user should credit the content provider for any public or private use of this image whenever possible.

Over 2 million pages served! 

Mitosis - Image of the Week - October 6, 2014

CIL:191 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/191

Description: 
The image shows mitotic metaphase (upper) and anaphase (lower) in Drosophila tissue culture cells immunostained for the microtubule severing protein katanin (green), microtubules (red) and kinetochores/chromosomes (blue). Katanin targets to chromosomes during both metaphase and anaphase and is responsible for inducing the depolymerization of attached microtubule plus-ends..

Authors: David Sharp, Dong Zhang, Gregory Rogers, and Daniel Buster

Licensing: Public Domain: This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. However, as is the norm in scientific publishing and as a matter of courtesy, any user should credit the content provider for any public or private use of this image whenever possible.

Classic Mitochondria. 

Image of the Week - September 29, 2014 
CIL:11401 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/11401

Description: Figures 220 (upper) and 221 (lower) from Chapter 7 (Mitochondria) of ‘The Cell, 2nd Ed.’ by Don W. Fawcett M.D. Mitochondrial density, and the number of cristae per mitochondrion are related to energy demands of each particular cell type and tissue. In the upper figure, epithelial cells from mouse are moderately active, and thus this mitochondrion has an average number of lamellar cristae. In the lower figure, rapidly contracting skeletal muscle from cricothyroid muscle of the bat has high energy requirements. Correspondingly, this mitochondrion contains many long and closely packed cristae. A PDF copy of the accompanying chapter is available on the ASCB’s BioEDUCATE website.

Author: Don W. Fawcett

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives:This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial No Derivatives License.

Classic Mitochondria. 

Image of the Week - September 29, 2014 

CIL:11401 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/11401

DescriptionFigures 220 (upper) and 221 (lower) from Chapter 7 (Mitochondria) of ‘The Cell, 2nd Ed.’ by Don W. Fawcett M.D. Mitochondrial density, and the number of cristae per mitochondrion are related to energy demands of each particular cell type and tissue. In the upper figure, epithelial cells from mouse are moderately active, and thus this mitochondrion has an average number of lamellar cristae. In the lower figure, rapidly contracting skeletal muscle from cricothyroid muscle of the bat has high energy requirements. Correspondingly, this mitochondrion contains many long and closely packed cristae. A PDF copy of the accompanying chapter is available on the ASCB’s BioEDUCATE website.

Author: Don W. Fawcett

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives:This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial No Derivatives License.

Best Fishes!

Image of the Week - September 22, 2014

CIL:39029 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/39029 

Description: Confocal micrograph of a blind cavefish embryo at around five days post-fertilisation viewed from the side (lateral view) with an antibody that targets a calcium binding protein (calretinin) shown in green, which highlights different neuronal types and their processes in the nervous system. The cavefish Mexican tetra (Astyanax mexicanus) has a seeing and a blind form; the latter lives in dark environments, and relies on other senses. The blind cavefish has specially adapted traits that its sighted relation (dwelling near the surface) does not. These include a greater number of sensory receptors and taste buds along its body; these taste buds are also more efficient than the equivalent cells in the seeing cavefish. The eyes are still present at this stage of development but they will degenerate naturally during the lifetime of the fish as they live in a dark environment where eyes are redundant. Adult cavefish are blind.

Author: Monica Folgueira and Steve Wilson


Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Best Fishes!

Image of the Week - September 22, 2014

CIL:39029 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/39029 

Description: Confocal micrograph of a blind cavefish embryo at around five days post-fertilisation viewed from the side (lateral view) with an antibody that targets a calcium binding protein (calretinin) shown in green, which highlights different neuronal types and their processes in the nervous system. The cavefish Mexican tetra (Astyanax mexicanus) has a seeing and a blind form; the latter lives in dark environments, and relies on other senses. The blind cavefish has specially adapted traits that its sighted relation (dwelling near the surface) does not. These include a greater number of sensory receptors and taste buds along its body; these taste buds are also more efficient than the equivalent cells in the seeing cavefish. The eyes are still present at this stage of development but they will degenerate naturally during the lifetime of the fish as they live in a dark environment where eyes are redundant. Adult cavefish are blind.

Author: Monica Folgueira and Steve Wilson

LicensingAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Fly-through cortex video featured on the new home page along with new images at The Cell. 

Image of the Week - September 15, 2014 


This is an absolutely amazing video. See the full video at 


CIL:41403 - http://cellimagelibrary.org/images/41403

Description: Video of an array tomogram of a mouse somatosensory cortex. The volume is a “fly-through” of a sagitally oriented rectangular slab of transgenic mouse somatosensory cortex. The overlay thumbnail at upper left renders a projection through the entire slab and the moving magenta rectangle shows the variably smaller area rendered full screen. The rendered volume was acquired by array tomography and stitched together in three dimensions from >10,000 image tiles. Green in this movie renders native FFP fluorescence, red renders anti-synapsin 1 immunofluorescence, and blue renders anti-tubulin immunofluorescence.

Dr. Smith wishes to acknowledge the work of Kristina Micheva, Brad Busse, Nicholas Weiler, Nancy O’Rourke and Gordon Wang. This video does not have audio on the Olympus BioScapes website, but a score by Catherine Rose Smith has been composed and performed to accompany the video.

More information is provided in two articles: Micheva, K.D., Busse, B.L., Weiler, N.C., O’Rourke, N., Smith, S.J (2010), Neuron 68:639-653; and Micheva, K.D., and Smith, S.J (2007), Neuron 55:25-36. Judges’ Special Award for Technical Merit, 2011 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®.

Author: Stephen Smith and the 2011 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives:This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial No Derivatives License.

Image of the Week - September 8, 2014
CIL:41814 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/41814
Description: Spartium flower primordium (bud), captured using epi-illumination. Honorable Mention, 2010 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®.
Authors: M. Reza Dadpour and the 2010 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®
Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

Image of the Week - September 8, 2014

CIL:41814 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/41814

DescriptionSpartium flower primordium (bud), captured using epi-illumination. Honorable Mention, 2010 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®.

Authors: M. Reza Dadpour and the 2010 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition®

Licensing: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives: This image is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives License

This is your brain on drugs.

Image of the Week - September 1, 2014


CIL:14971 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/14971Description: Distribution of interneurons expressing EGFP from the 5HT3 receptor promoter (Tg(Htr3a-EGFP)DH30Gsat, www.gensat.org) in the dorsal hippocampus colabelled for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (red) and counterstained with DAPI (blue) to show the cell layers. This image is part of a series characterizing EGFP expression from the 5HT3 promoter throughout the brain.Authors: Margaret I. DavisLicensing: Public Domain: This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. However, as is the norm in scientific publishing and as a matter of courtesy, any user should credit the content provider for any public or private use of this image whenever possible.

This is your brain on drugs.

Image of the Week - September 1, 2014

CIL:14971 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/14971

Description: Distribution of interneurons expressing EGFP from the 5HT3 receptor promoter (Tg(Htr3a-EGFP)DH30Gsat, www.gensat.org
) in the dorsal hippocampus colabelled for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (red) and counterstained with DAPI (blue) to show the cell layers. This image is part of a series characterizing EGFP expression from the 5HT3 promoter throughout the brain.

Authors: Margaret I. Davis

Licensing: Public Domain: This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. However, as is the norm in scientific publishing and as a matter of courtesy, any user should credit the content provider for any public or private use of this image whenever possible.

Image of the Week – August 25, 2014 
CIL:38990 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38990
Description: Colorized scanning electron micrograph of a human egg. The egg is surrounded by a glycoprotein coat called the zona pellucida which aids in trapping and binding the sperm. Two residual coronal cells from the ovarian follicle are attached to the zona pellucida. The egg is sitting on the point of a pin.
Author: Yorgos Nikas
Licensing:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week – August 25, 2014 

CIL:38990 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38990

DescriptionColorized scanning electron micrograph of a human egg. The egg is surrounded by a glycoprotein coat called the zona pellucida which aids in trapping and binding the sperm. Two residual coronal cells from the ovarian follicle are attached to the zona pellucida. The egg is sitting on the point of a pin.

Author: Yorgos Nikas

Licensing:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week – August 18, 2014 
CIL:38912 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38912
Description: Human HeLa cancer cells in culture showing the nuclei in red and the tubulin component of the cytoskeleton in green. The blue staining is a mitotic checkpoint protein that remains in the cytoplasm until pro-metaphase when it is involved in regulating cell division. HeLa cells are derived from a human cervical cancer and can be propogated indefinitely in culture.
Author: Matthew Daniels
Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week – August 18, 2014 

CIL:38912 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38912

DescriptionHuman HeLa cancer cells in culture showing the nuclei in red and the tubulin component of the cytoskeleton in green. The blue staining is a mitotic checkpoint protein that remains in the cytoplasm until pro-metaphase when it is involved in regulating cell division. HeLa cells are derived from a human cervical cancer and can be propogated indefinitely in culture.

Author: Matthew Daniels

LicensingAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Four wonderful years so far. Image of the Week – August 11, 2014 
We thank you for the wonderful gift of over 500,000 visits and almost 2 million pages viewed.
To thank you we present one of your favorite images from the past.
CIL:38817 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38817
Description: Scanning electron micrograph of a Vaginicola, a single-celled creature found in pond water. The cell (green) secretes and lives within a protective casing called a lorica into which it can contract. The cell is attached to the bottom of the lorica and has hair-like cilia at the end, which it uses for feeding. Scanning electron micrograph 2000 Collection Wellcome Images. 
Author: David Furness

Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Four wonderful years so far. Image of the Week – August 11, 2014 

We thank you for the wonderful gift of over 500,000 visits and almost 2 million pages viewed.

To thank you we present one of your favorite images from the past.

CIL:38817 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/38817

Description: Scanning electron micrograph of a Vaginicola, a single-celled creature found in pond water. The cell (green) secretes and lives within a protective casing called a lorica into which it can contract. The cell is attached to the bottom of the lorica and has hair-like cilia at the end, which it uses for feeding. Scanning electron micrograph 2000 Collection Wellcome Images. 

Author: David Furness

LicensingAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)